Air Weapons

Caudron

C.714

Designed by Marcel Riffard, the Caudron C.714 (often called Cyclone) was developed as a lightweight fighter, one of the few to achieve production and actually serve in World War II. It was based on a series of racing aircraft of mostly wooden construction made for a quite economical fighter which could be built rapidly in large numbers. Unfortunately, the light fighter concept proved significantly flawed and only a small number ended up in service, mostly with some Polish volunteer training squadrons which flew against the Luftwaffe, claiming 12 aircraft destroyed at a cost of 13 of their own. After the surrender, a small number were used by Vichy forces while others were taken over and used by the Luftwaffe; a few partly assembled units were also sent to Finland, part of a larger order which was interrupted by the capitulation although one squadron was formed.

First flight of the prototype C.714 took place on 6 July 1938, it had been based on the earlier C.710 lightweight fighter and the C.713 fighter with retractable landing gear and a redigned vertail tail surfaces. The C.714 was the main production version armed with wing-mounted machine-guns while other planned developments featured more powerful engines but none ever reached production.

Preceded by:

None

Succeeded by:

None

Datafile

DesignC.714
TypeFighter
Year1939
Crew1
Dimensions
Length8.63 m
Height2.87 m
Wing Span8.97 m
Wing Area12.5 m²
Weight
Empty1,400 kg
Maximum1,880 kg
Wing Loading150.4 kg/m²
Performance
Speed486 km/h
Ceiling9,100 m
Range900 km
Powerplant
Engine1 x 12R 03
Renault
336 kW
Thrust/Weight0.29
Armament
Guns4 x 7.5-mm
Payload-
Production
Built90
Total91

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