Air Weapons

Fokker

G.I

The Fokker G.I was one of the first examples of the twin-engined heavy fighter concept which had gained popularity during the 1930s. Nicknamed Le Foucher (The Grim Reaper), it was remarkable for being designed in the rare twin boom and pod configuration which would be found in later aircraft like the Fw 189 or the P-38. As a result, this innovative aircraft was quick to attack foreign interest, first by the Spanish Republican government, then Finland, Sweden, and Denmark, some of which acquired license rights to build it (Spanish units were later embargoed and intended to be sent to Estonia). Unfortunately, the German invasion in May 1940 forced the few Dutch and incomplete Spanish examples to fly in combat where most were destroyed in a matter of days. All surviving or unfinished units were eventually taken over by the Luftwaffe as trainers.

Maiden flight of the prototype G.I took place in October 1937 with deliveries beginning the following year. Variants included the G.IA powered by Mercury engines and the G.IB for Spain with a Pratt & Whitney powerplant. In the event no aircraft intended for export was actually delivered.

Preceded by:

None

Succeeded by:

None

Datafile

DesignG.IAG.IB
TypeHeavy FighterHeavy Fighter
Year19381938
Crew2-32-3
Dimensions
Length10.87 m10.87 m
Height3.40 m3.40 m
Wing Span17.15 m17.15 m
Wing Area38.3 m²38.3 m²
Weight
Empty3,330 kg3,150 kg
Maximum5,000 kg4,800 kg
Wing Loading130.5 kg/m²125.3 kg/m²
Performance
Speed475 km/h431 km/h
Ceiling9,300 m8,695 m
Range1,500 km1,470 km
Powerplant
Engine2 x Mercury VIII
Bristol
619 kW
2 x R-1535-SB4-G
Pratt & Whitney
559 kW
Thrust/Weight0.450.43
Armament
Guns9 x 7.9-mm
2 x 23-mm
3 x 7.9-mm
Payload400 kg400 kg
Production
Built3625
Total62