Air Weapons

Canadair

CP-107 Argus

Based on the Bristol Britannia airliner, the Canadair CP-107 Argus was a highly advanced maritime patrol aircraft which was widely thought to be the finest in the world during its day. The Argus shared the airliner's wings, tail surfaces, and landing gear but featured an unpressurized fuselage which held two weapons bays which could carry bombs, depth charges, torpedoes, and mines; additional loads included sonobuoy dispensers as well as underwing weapons pylons intended for the aborted Petrol air-to-surface missile and which in the event were rarely used. Equipment was highly sophisticated and was dominated by either US or British radar installed in a prominent chin radome in addition to electronic counter-measures (ECM) and diesel exhaust detectors. CP-107s eventually equipped four RCAF Maritime Command squadrons where they remained in service until 1981 and replaced by the CP-140 (a Canadian version of the P-3 Orion).

The first Argus prototype flew on 28 March 1957 with deliveries of the CP-107 Mk. 1 beginning the following year. These featured US APS-20 radar which was later substituted for the more advanced British ASV-21 in the Mk. 2 which additionally featured upgraded communications and ECM equipment.

Preceded by:

None

Succeeded by:

None

Datafile

DesignCP-107 Mk. 2
NameArgus
TypeMaritime Patrol
Year1958
Crew15
Dimensions
Length39.09 m
Height11.20 m
Wing Span43.37 m
Wing Area192.8 m²
Weight
Empty36,968 kg
Maximum71,215 kg
Wing Loading369.4 kg/m²
Performance
Speed507 km/h
Ceiling8,839 m
Range9,495 km
Powerplant
Engine4 x R-3350-32W
Wright
2,759 kW
Thrust/Weight0.36
Sensors
RadarASV-21
Armament
Guns-
Payload7,076 kg
Hardpoints2
Production
Built20
Total33