Armed Forces & Civilian Casualties

 

Allied
  Peak Size of Armed Forces Military
Killed
Civilian
Killed
Australia 680,000 23,365 < 100
Belgium 650,000 9,561 75,000
Brazil 200,000 943 -
Canada 780,000 37,476 -
China 5,000,000 1,319,958 < 10,000,000
Czechoslovakia 180,000 6,683 310,000
Denmark 25,000 4,339 2,000
France 5,000,000 210,671 173,260
Greece 414,000 16,357 155,300
India 2,400,000 24,338 -
Luxembourg 12,000 2,000 5,000
Netherlands 410,000 13,700 236,000
New Zealand 157,000 10,033 -
Norway 45,000 4,780 7,000
Poland 1,000,000 123,178 5,675,000
South Africa 140,000 8,681 -
United Kingdom 5,120,000 271,311 92,673
United States 12,300,000 405,399 < 10
U.S.S.R. 12,500,000 10,008,434 16,900,000
Yugoslavia 500,000 305,000 1,400,000

 

Axis
  Peak Size of Armed Forces Military
Killed
Civilian
Killed
Bulgaria 450,000 18,500 10,000
Finland 250,000 79,047 11,000
Germany 10,200,000 3,250,000 2,050,000
Hungary 350,000 147,435 280,000
Italy 3,750,000 242,232 152,941
Japan 6,095,000 1,740,000 672,000
Romania 600,000 519,822 465,000

 

Notes:

Author's Note - Perhaps no other group of statistics lends itself to such differences among sources than casualties. Suffice to say that differences may amount to the millions making it impossible to present figures which are universally accepted, for example, Soviet civilian dead vary from as low as 6 million up to 24 million. Some figures include famine casualties and other indirectly-related causes. The figures listed here are an attempt to find the most accepted numbers (the medians, rather than the means), reflecting the direct cost of the war incurred by the participants.

(1) Official government figures are given when available.

(2) China military dead Nationalist only (Communist aprox. 500,000 dead).

(3) United Kingdom civilian dead include merchant marines (30,248 dead).

(4) United States military dead include all causes (291,577 official battle dead).

Sources: Armed Forces - Grolier Online - World War II Commemoration, Casualties - Historical Atlas of the Twentieth Century.